Past headlines:

I confess

13 Apr/15

A social media primer – in three parts

22 May/14

The state of content marketing, 2013

15 May/13

Same great taste, stylish new name

18 Jan/13

Mega Quarry Stopped.

29 Nov/12

Owning your own moment

09 Jul/12

Melancthon: our greatest success of 2011

11 Jan/12

Sometimes it’s easy

03 Aug/11

The fall of Rome

05 Jul/11

Not a %&* problem!

26 May/11

Information snack packs

13 Apr/11

Disaster optics

19 Mar/11

The wireless marionette

13 Mar/11

The Oracle Effect

30 Oct/10

I confess

I confess

I confess that I’m not a frequent blogger, at least not for my own company. Nor am I a frequent user of social media for ¡Outwrite! Why? It’s work. It takes time. And it’s never a high priority since it’s not deadline-driven. There’s a lesson there!

If you sell a product or a service and you want to sell more, blogging can only help. When blogs say the right things—typically insightful, useful things based on your specific, specialized knowledge—it instils confidence. If posts are frequent enough and the blog is properly optimized for Search, it attracts a following.

Well thought out blog posts showcase your knowledge and abilities, creating preference for you, your brand, or both. Put another way, thought leadership. It’s the kind of thing that inspires industries reporters to interview you for their stories.

Reading through several blog entries gives prospects a sense of what your company is all about and how good you are at what you do. Taken together, dozens of blog entries give insight into your company’s beliefs, methods and wisdom.

The SEO thing

Publishing blog posts regularly is a good start. But you also need to make sure that the kind of people you’re selling to find your posts. That involves three things:

The process may sound daunting, but really it’s not. Small actions add up. It is, in fact, totally worth it.

Scheduling

For a blog to thrive, you have to set deadlines. We help clients to create a content calendar of topics and to plan each post. Our clients typically connect us with one of their people—a subject matter expert in whatever we are blogging about that week—and we use their knowledge to write the blog. If they are authoring the blog, we capture their speaking style.

If a company is going to tackle blog writing and publishing internally, it simply needs to be treated like any of your core business functions: put it on a timeline and if it doesn’t get done according to schedule, there are consequences.

I must confess that I haven’t done this here at HQ. ¡Outwrite! doesn’t always from the things that we do for our clients, including building a process around blogging and social media. When it’s an occasional thing, it drops off the radar. If we were shoemakers, our children would go barefoot. So let that be a lesson to you!